Meeta Kaur, Nina Chanpreet Kaur and Sangeeta Luthra

Meeta Kaur, Nina Chanpreet Kaur and Sangeeta Luthra



Meeta Kaur

Writer, editor and independent researcher

Meeta Kaur, MFA, is a writer, community advocate, educator, and mother-in-progress. Meeta created the Sikh American Women and Their Love Stories Collection and serves as the editor and organizer. Her past experience writing for numerous news outlets, receiving a grant and writing residency for fiction, and serving as a community advocate has given this project the foundation needed to be a significant literary contribution globally. She is also working on a women’s fantasy fiction that fuels her own creative power. Meeta finds the challenge of being a mother who authentically gives her children unconditional love one of her finest life experiences.

Nina Chanpreet Kaur

Writer, educator and consultant

Nina Chanpreet Kaur, M.S.Ed. is a writer, educator and consultant. Currently, Nina is the Director of School Partnerships at Peace First. She is also the Founder of Kitchen Table Kids which teaches children intercultural, interfaith and social emotional skills in cooking classes inspired by Guru Nanak. Her writing has been featured in a range of publications including The Harlem Times, SikhChic and Yoni Ki Baat. Nina is currently an editorial board member for the Sikh Women and Their Love Stories project. She is the author of From Authenticity to Assimilation: Bhangra in the lives of second generation Punjabi Sikh youth.

Dr. Sangeeta Luthra

Writer, editor and independent researcher

Dr. Sangeeta Luthra is an anthropologist and educator. Over the last 15 years she has taught classes in anthropology, cultural studies, and global studies in public and private universities. She has conducted ethnographic research on non-governmental organizations in the greater New Delhi area with a special focus on women’s empowerment, workplace literacy, micro-lending, and sustainable development. Her research interests are women’s development and empowerment, feminist theory, political theory, and Sikhs in the diaspora.

Sikh American Women and Their Love Stories Collection

While Sikh American women do a lions-share of organizing and executing the business of the Sikh community, their experiences of faith, family, and community are under-represented in art, literature, and scholarship. In fact, the experience and image of a Sikh woman is obsolete and – in most cases – invisible in the North American milieu. The modern landscapes and political and
social influences that shape Sikh women’s lives as well as the subsequent paths they take have yet to be understood, documented, shared and absorbed by our cultural psyche.

Women straddle multiple lives and worlds – cross cultural, interreligious, intergenerational, work and home spheres. In between these spaces, there is one constant current and that is the relationship to the divine, or Waheguru. This current generates love in multiple ways for Sikh American women.
Through the The Sikh American Women and Their Love Stories Collection project, we will interview women writers contributing to the project to assess what it means to be a Sikh woman living in North America. The “love story” narrative is the vehicle for revealing the depth and
meaning of a Sikh woman’s life in this contemporary time and space. Ranging from dramatic to humorous, these stories represent distinct and unique roadmaps for the Sikh spiritual journey for women, girls, daughters, mothers, and wives in particular. Moreover, each story is rich with critical insight into Sikh women and their experience of spirituality, healing, empowerment, culture, work/sewa, ethics, parenting practices, and relationship building with Sikh men,
women, and children. This will help our greater community determine the critical or important questions and subjects that are most dear to Sikh women in North America. Understanding the challenges, the support mechanisms, and the needs of today’s Sikh women will help us build frameworks for greater support for success in all aspects of living.

Through an ethnographic analysis of interviews and personal narratives from approximately 30 women from the U.S. and Canada ages 18 – 55, we will explore the following questions by highlighting themes with a range of relevant theoretical foundations including (but not limited to) feminist and spiritual theories. The qualitative analysis will conclude with a culminating paper that includes an overview of the major themes and analyses from the research.